Brian & Brandi's Van's RV10 Build

Sharing our files


by Brian Wednesday, March 27, 2013

Below are links to a few documents that we created, or modified. We're sharing them to the community in case it helps anyone. I think it would be a great starting point if you didnt have any of this yet or at least needed some ideas. 

Here is a .zip file of all of the files below:

Wiring spreadsheet. Lists buses, wire gauges, wire numbers, amp chart, switch names.

Wiring Diagram. Based off Bob Nuckols Z-13. Modified to include avionics switch.

RV-10 Airplane Checklist. Formatted to print into a nice little checklist booklet.

RV-10 Pilots Operating Handbook. Started with one that Mike Andresen (azcloudflyer.com) created and we modified it a bit for our needs.

RV-10 Weight and Balance. A great spreadsheet for RV-10 weight and balance. Someone else created this. 

Checklist .ace file. For a Garmin 696, customized for our airplane but a good starting point. Make sure to get the Garmin Aviation Checklist Editor software to go with this. 

RV-10 Cost Planner. Help estimate the total cost of the various kits and accessories and helps plan when to order the items.

Flight testing document. Phase 1 fly off period should be structured. Following a test plan such as this help. I think this was created by Mike Andresen originally.

Nose wheel tension


by Brian Monday, March 25, 2013

When landing, after the nose wheel comes down the nose wheel kind of shimmies a bit and I didnt like that so I decided to tighten up the nose wheel tension. Previously I set it by the book at the 26 or so lbs of break out force. I tightened it up one more notch since it can only go in increments based on the cotter pin fitting in the next castle nut notch. Well, that fixed the problem, however now its a little harder to taxi around and involves riding the brakes a bit more. So I think I'll put it back to what the plans call for and just put up with the unpleasant shimmy. Just wanted to share in case anyone comes across the same issue. 

Edit: better option: drill new hole for cotter pin and get it to right break-out value. 

Dynamic Propeller Balancing


by Brandi Friday, March 22, 2013

This past Sunday we flew down to KFFC (Peachtree City, GA) for the Falcon RV Squadron St. Patrick's Day potluck and to get our prop balanced. The potluck was amazing, as usual, and the prop balancing was neat to learn and take part in.

First we removed the top of the cowling and bolted a small sensor to the engine. He then put a piece of reflector tape on the prop to mark 0 degrees. 

 

We ran the sensor cables down the wing and connected them to the handheld receiver. Then, Brian got in the plane and ran it up to about 2400 RPM. Once the RPM was stable, Brian gave the thumbs up and we grabbed a reading from the receiver. It took all of 5 seconds to get a reading. 

At the first reading, our prop came in with a vibration level due to mass imbalance of 0.25 IPS (inches per second) (low end of rough) @ 111 degrees. We drilled a hole in the back plate of the spinner and installed a bolt with some washers @ 291 degrees. After putting the spinner back on, Brian got back in the plane and we recorded our second reading. The second reading was much better: 0.07 IPS (good) @ 219 degrees. We could chase this all day but we decided to stop here. Tommy, the expert prop balancer at KFFC, told us that any change under 0.10 IPS wasn't noticeable.

After the potluck, we got in the plane and headed home. At this point, we had both almost forgot about the prop balancing. At least, until we took off. Oh boy! What a difference!! I didn't think our plane was THAT rough to begin with but I felt the difference before we were 1000 feet off the ground. A few seconds later, Brian looked at me and we both just smiled. We knew the flight home was going to be the best one yet! =D

This plane is so amazing... and so are the views!